John GABBERT

Male Abt 1839 - 1863  (~ 24 years)


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  • Name John GABBERT 
    Born Abt 1839 
    Gender Male 
    Died 25 Apr 1863  Vernon County, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • THE MAYFIELD BROTHERS
      From the Bushwacker Museum in Vernon County, Missouri:

      The 1887 Vernon County History Book paints some lively scenes about true stories of real people in Vernon and surrounding counties during the Civil War. Often it wasn't simply individuals who 'went to war'. Many times it was the entire family that fought to preserve their lifestyles. One such family was well-known in Vernon County. The Mayfield family were all actively involved in the war, men and women. Here are some incidents described in the 1887 edition that show the adventures of two Bushwhackers who became known far and wide as 'The Mayfield Brothers'.

      "Two noted Confederate partisans who came to be well known throughout Southwest Missouri during the year 1862, were Brice E. and John Crawford Mayfield, brothers, and sons of John Mayfield, who settled on section 19, Montevallo township, in 1856, and died in May, 1858. At the outbreak of the war Brice Mayfield was 27 years of age, and married, and Crawford (or "Crack," as he was better known,) was 21. Both enlisted in Gatewood's company and were in the battle of Wilson's Creek. At the skirmish on Drywood, in this county, "Crack" Mayfield was taken prisoner, but not long after-wards was released on parole.

      Some time in the early winter of 1862 Brice Mayfield came back into Vernon with some kind of recruiting authority, and from this time forward the two brothers engaged in irregular warfare against the Federals in this part of the State. Their deeds and adventures, if fully related, would fill a considerable volume. They were splendid horse-men, not troubled with conscientious scruples regarding the manner in which they acquired their steeds, shrewd in forming their plans and cool and thorough in their execution, and bold and daring fighters.

      The Mayfield boys operated in the border counties, chiefly between the Osage River and the Arkansas line. Their exploits are perhaps largely exaggerated, but some of them were remarkable. On one oc-casion in the early spring of 1872, while a company of the 6th Kan-sas was stationed at old Montevallo, seven of the men, unarmed, rode out one evening to McCarty's branch, at the Reavis ford, half a mile to the west, to water their horses. While the horses were drinking Brice and "Crack" Mayfield and John Gabbert suddenly appeared from the opposite bank and with drawn revolvers got the drop on the unsuspecting Federals and marched the entire party away. The prisoners were kept in Dunnagin's Grove for some days. The Mayfield boys sent their sister Ella and Miss Eliza Gabbert to the Federal commander to say that all the prisoners would be given for Capt. Henry Taylor, then a prisoner at Fort Scott, but the offer was re-fused. Finally the captives were escorted to the Drywood and turned loose and advised to go to "bleeding Kansas" and stay there.

      On another occasion the boys were being chased by a party of the 1st Iowa Cavalry. One of the Federals dismounted to pick up his hat; which had been shot from his head by "Crack" Mayfield. His horse, a fine sorrel mare, broke away after the bushwhackers, and being relieved of its rider soon came up with " Crack," who took her by the bridle and led her away in safety. It is said that this animal was afterward ridden by Gen. Joe Shelby and killed under him in one of his battles in Arkansas.

      The Mayfield boys fired upon many a Federal picket post, bush-whacked many a Federal scouting and foraging party, terrorized many a Union citizen, and gained for themselves the admiration of a large share of the Confederate element of Southwest Missouri. But at last their time came. On the morning of the 26th of December 1862, both were killed a few miles north of Neosho, in Newton County.

      The circumstances of their death were as follows: A Federal wagon train was on the way from Ft. Scott to Bentonville. The night it encamped in Neosho two of the escort, Sam Kaiserman and Jack Hudson, both of the 6th Kansas, in company with a citizen boy about seventeen years of age, named Coyer, whose home was near Neosho, stayed at the house of a man named Parnell, on Shoal creek, where there were a number of young women.

      The Mayfield boys were in the vicinity, and learning of the presence of the two soldiers determined to either capture or kill them. Early on the morning of the 26th, about breakfast time, they rode tip to Parnell's and called. As they were dressed in Federal blue it was supposed they were Union soldiers, and Kaiserman and Hudson walked out to meet them. Suddenly the Mayfields drew their re-volvers and opened fire. Hudson fell mortally wounded, but Kaiser-man picked him up and bore him into the house. The Mayfields dismounted and ran to the house. Young Coyer came to the door and was shot down and instantly killed. Kaiserman killed both of the Mayfield brothers as they stood on the porch trying to break down the door. " Crack " was killed first, and the next shot brought down Brice, who fell across his brother's body, both dying almost instantly.
      As soon as possible Kaiserman mounted his horse and, informing Mr. Parnell that if on his return all was not as he left it the house would be burned, he galloped to Neosho and reported what had oc-curred. A party was at once sent out with Kaiserman, and the four dead bodies were brought back to Neosho, with all of the horses and arms. On arriving at Neosho the corpses of the Mayfields were recognized by certain citizens and both buried in one grave."

      Fought for the Confederacy and was a Bushwacker from Missouri.

      Every member of the Mayfield was pro-Confederate. From the mother to the youngest child there was no exception. Even the daughters became strong partisans and rendered active and valuable service for the cause. Their experience, while painful upon the whole, was highly thrilling, perilous, and interesting, and ought to be related in full, without exaggeration or embelishment.
      The oldest three of the Mayfield sisters Ella, Sallie and Lenora, were married when the war came on. The husbands of all three wore the gray.
      Sallie's husband, D. P. McGiboney, was killed Feb. 7, 1862, in a fight with Kansas troops, who did not bury the body for three days, and then tossed it into a shallow grave, near the bank of a small stream. Some time afterward, the young widow, she was then but 23, although the mother of two small children, exhumed the body herself and carted it to the old Montevallo graveyard, where it was reinterred March 10, after another exposure of five days.
      Lenora's husband, John Gabbert, was a partisan ranger and was killed April 25, 1863 by a Federal scouting party from either the 6th Kansas or 3rd Wisconsin in the road between the Gabbert farm and Old Montevallo. He was but 24 years of age and his wife was much younger.
      Ella was separated by the war from her husband, a Mr. Phillips, and in the spring or summer of 1863 was married to a noted bushwacker named David Majors, of Cass County, but she was invariably known as Ella Mayfield.
    Person ID I9254  My Family Tree | Wade Side
    Last Modified 9 Apr 2009 

    Father William GABBERT,   b. 26 Jan 1814, Casey County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Oct 1863, Benton County, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 49 years) 
    Mother Rebecca WADE,   b. 24 Oct 1814, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Jul 1894, Montevallo, Vernon County, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Married 25 Feb 1834  Washington County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F2037  Group Sheet

    Family Lennora MAYFIELD,   b. 6 Apr 1839, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Jul 1917, Grapevine, Tarrant County , Texas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Married 10 Aug 1861 
    Children 
    +1. John Crawford GABBERT,   b. Bef 1863,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Ida GABBERT,   b. Bef 1863,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 16 Nov 2008 
    Family ID F3076  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsDied - 25 Apr 1863 - Vernon County, Missouri, USA Link to Google Earth
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  • Histories
    Ella Mayfield's Pawpaw Militia: A Civil War Adventure in Vernon Co., Missouri (Paperback)
by Fay Risner (Author)
    Ella Mayfield's Pawpaw Militia: A Civil War Adventure in Vernon Co., Missouri (Paperback) by Fay Risner (Author)
    Rebecca Wade Gabbert, her husband William, son John, and daughter-in-law Lenora Mayfield Gabbert are mentioned in this book. The book features Lenora's sister, Ella.
    Confederate Sisters
    Confederate Sisters
    Every member of the Mayfield was pro-Confederate. From the mother to the youngest child there was no exception. Even the daughters became strong partisans and rendered active and valuable service for the cause.
    Fire and Sword, A Story of a Missouri County in the Civil War
    Fire and Sword, A Story of a Missouri County in the Civil War
    We also have a new book that was just released this month, “Fire and Sword, A Story of a Missouri County in the Civil War”, for $19.95. This book is not fiction but is a compellation of articles about events in Vernon County during the War. The Gabberts and Mayfields are in several of the articles. This book would give you a pretty clear picture of what life was like for them during those very tumultuous years.

    Terry Ramsey
    Bushwhacker Museum Coordinator